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Full Version: Turkey Bans Media Coverage of Deadly Peace Rally Bombing
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Source: https://grasswire.com/story/311/Ankara-Rally



At least 86 people are dead and hundreds more wounded after an apparent bombing at a peace rally on Saturday in Ankara.

Two explosions ripped through the event outside the Ankara train station where members of the Kurdish People’s Democratic Party (HDP) were gathering for a peace rally. The bombs came ahead of a planned march by the HDP, activists and the labor unions and activists against the conflict between Turkish authorities and the militant Kurdish Workers' Party (PKK).

Health Minister Mehmet Müezzionğlu said on Saturday that 62 people died at the scene and 24 in hospitals. 186 people are injured and 18 were undergoing surgery, Müezzionğlu said.

Turkey's media watchdog said Saturday that Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu's office declared a "temporary media ban" on the attack. Turkish social media users reported being unable to access Twitter and Facebook without a VPN.

The cause of the explosions was not immediately clear but Davutoğlu said on Saturday there are "strong signs" suicide bombers are responsible.

Davutoğlu condemned the attacks and declared three days of mourning.

On Saturday, the PKK ordered its fighters to halt military activity until Parliamentary elections are held on November 1. The PKK said the order was in response to public pressure and it would only act in self-defense.
Turkey became a US ally as soon as it was formed. Anti-Soviet and perfectly willing to lend us the land to position missile bases and military forces, Turkey caused the USSR as much panic as Cuba would later create in Miami.

We overlook the country's obvious faults. The country is periodically seized by spasms of freely elected Islamist extremist governments, which inevitably get overthrown by a military junta - making democracy in Turkey seem like a bad joke. The genocides in Armenia and Kurdistan. The slaughter of the Greek population and the suppression of the Patriarchy of Constantinople. An appalling human rights record, prisons famous the world over for medieval cruelty and torture of prisoners. Disastrous economic policies that render the currency worthless and non-convertable. The never ending demand for bailouts, always with the implicit threat of an even worse regime displacing the one that ran up the debts and stuck Washington with the bills. The invasion of Cyprus, the instillation of a puppet regime unrecognized by anyone other than the Turks who prop it up. The steady flow of heroin and contraband into Eastern Europe. The widespread corruption that makes it so damned easy to bribe border patrol that even a child could do it.

Turkey is for us what North Korea is to China.

Ankara exploits Asia Minor's geography to keep us on the hook. First, it meant Neptune missiles on the Soviet border and a forward operations base in the Balkans. Then, it became the fulfillment of Bush's fantasy of an Islamic democracy. Now, it's a launchpad for operations in the Levant, an energy pipeline for the EU, a CIA base for operations in Iran and a "black site" for the torture of extraordinarily rendered POWs.

And a geopolitical pain in the ass.
Just an observation on the economics side. High inflation is associated with currency pegged against a strong foreign currency & even stronger inflation after the peg regime is removed. A careful study of all hyperinflation in history list the following reasons: loss of a war, collapse of output, brazen corruption, political instability, and finally the end of a peg with a strong currency. The overproduction of money is always a consequence of a crisis of hyperinflation, never the cause of it.
Turkey runs large current account deficits (it's a net exporter of aggregate demand), has low public debt figures, vertical unemployment (more than 10 in real terms) & 17% of the population is below the poverty line & has a pretty high GINI of 40.
After Bretton Woods came to an end, they should have never proceeded with their pegs, instead they should have allowed their currency to float. Turkey should invest more in domestic output capability & actually employ its reserve army of unemployed; that would be the proper price anchor as the NAIRU is failing them anyway in regard to price stability. (ah, the irony of it)
Pegs are never ever a good idea.

Helsworth Wrote:
Just an observation on the economics side. High inflation is associated with currency pegged against a strong foreign currency & even stronger inflation after the peg regime is removed. A careful study of all hyperinflation in history list the following reasons: loss of a war, collapse of output, brazen corruption, political instability, and finally the end of a peg with a strong currency. The overproduction of money is always a consequence of a crisis of hyperinflation, never the cause of it.
Turkey runs large current account deficits (it's a net exporter of aggregate demand), has low public debt figures, vertical unemployment (more than 10 in real terms) & 17% of the population is below the poverty line & has a pretty high GINI of 40.
After Bretton Woods came to an end, they should have never proceeded with their pegs, instead they should have allowed their currency to float. Turkey should invest more in domestic output capability & actually employ its reserve army of unemployed; that would be the proper price anchor as the NAIRU is failing them anyway in regard to price stability. (ah, the irony of it)
Pegs are never ever a good idea.


Neither is electing a government whose playbook is a 9th century religious text. Or relying on the military to overthrow the bad decisions of the electorate just when things start to go sour. Turkey is a country that refuses to learn from it's mistakes, because there's never any consequences. Uncle Sam always bails out his wayward nephew, so the nephew thinks he can get away with anything.

The real reason why the US wants Turkey to join the EU is so we don't have to deal with them any longer. Let Brussels take the basket case off our hands, so we can continue to enjoy the military advantages Turkey has to offer without having to pay for it.

This of course is pure fantasy on Washington's part. Euroskeptic parties will block every attempt to federalize Europe. So long as the EU maintains separate economic policies despite the common currency, we will see austerity rather than cash transfers as a response to economic downturns. Greece should serve as an object lesson. There's never going to be a United States of Europe, and Turkey isn't going to become the EU's version of Alabama.

I agree with you. Turkey continues to this day to be a sick man.

Helsworth Wrote:
I agree with you. Turkey continues to this day to be a sick man.


Jared Diamond's book Collapse suggests that sometimes social and economic collapse as horrific as it can be, is the only way for a society to purge itself of its self destructive elements. Interventionism by larger powers does not generally benefit the society as a whole. Michela Wrong's books Its Our Turn to Eat, I Didn't Do It For You and In The Footsteps of Mr Kurtz offer examples of how that policy has played out in East Africa. David Rieff's book A Bed for the Night and Franz de Waal's text Dead Aid offer similar examples, as does The Anti-Politics Machine.

By propping up corrupt regimes we fool ourselves into thinking we are preserving order and stability. In fact, we are preserving corruption, political violence and the exploitation of the weak. That doesn't imply that humanitarian aid should cease entirely- of course we should allow groups like MSF and the AFSC to continue their vital work saving the lives of individuals in crisis. However, we oughtn't send foreign aid to governments whose very behavior perpetuate the cycles of bribery and bakshish, disenfranchising the poor and offering no way out for those who aren't politically well connected.

Related to this

Edvard Kardelj Wrote:
A look at East Africa has demonstrated that


To play perhaps the devil's advocate, Somalia is a success story in this regard. Intervention from other countries has brought a great deal of stability and prosperity to a war-torn country.

A bit more relevant to the thread, fuck Erdogan.

VineFynn Wrote:

To play perhaps the devil's advocate, Somalia is a success story in this regard. Intervention from other countries has brought a great deal of stability and prosperity to a war-torn country.

A bit more relevant to the thread, fuck Erdogan.


Without foreign intervention by both the US and the SSR, Said Barre would never have existed. Thats hardly a success story

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