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yangusbeef

A long long time ago, I dismissed Donald Trump as a mere demagogue. Why should I listen, or even consider, a man who so boldly states what the media has coined as erroneous statements of absurd racism? However, after a while, I noticed a steady flow of unabridged, and what I felt as unwarranted, hate towards Donald Trump and his policies. I began to notice that the comments the media had coined as racist are not racist at all, and that most of their collective content of Trump are dishonest, extremely dishonest and crudely unfair. And therefore, I came to this conclusion: if the biased media, Liberal racists, regressive progressives, and outright marxists hate him, then surely there something more to this man than what meets the eye, behind the nonsensical sophomoric rubbish that he on a daily basis spews to his desperate audience. And so I began reading his literature, beginning with his most recent political book, Crippled America, and finishing with, what I felt was a masterpiece, The Art of the Deal. After reading both, I realized he was quite intelligent politically, and that, for the most part, the core of his views have not changed after all these years. I learned that what the media had coined as a contradiction, he explained he only changes if he deems his old policies unworthy for contemporary times, for example a single payer system for healthcare. In the Art of the Deal, although a book mostly about business, he does explain and well supports that he had built most of his wealth without his father's support, and that by the time of his inheritance, he was already quite wealthy and influential by the deals he had made in manhattan and elsewhere. In the beginning, his father only started him out with a million dollar loan. And as you can imagine, in the rich parts of manhattan that is merely pocket change, even with that amount of money, he had to bide his time and follow the markets, waiting for the perfect time to buy, and to make the biggest deal possible, while everyone else was running in circles trying to figure out what to do. Point being, the media and wealthy have been dishonest about his business ventures as well. In his other book, Crippled America, he explains why they attack him: they are being threatened. Apparently, his comments on illegals had upset quite a few influential individuals, and therefore they were actively threatening his partners to disavow him or they would lose their business. And by all means, these were people most could not afford to lose business with. The man who was threatened was the one who gave him this prophecy. And therefore, many of his old friends left him. Quickly, he was literally ganged up on all side, Republicans, Democrats, and the press. But Trump does not give up easily; as long as the people support him, he will never throw in the towel. And ironically, which I have previously explained, the more they attack him, the stronger he gets. The point being, Donald Trump is not the man you think he is, and I implore you to research him beyond what the media says, beyond what your friends say. He is intelligent, a gem among empty heads who will say anything that sounds nice and likewise garners them support; no great brain but a big smile. He has called every president from Carter to Obama this. They will never say what is unpopular, they only say what will get them votes, no matter how dishonest it is.
And I understand Politico calls him dishonest, but I honestly have no respect for Politico. I have reviewed their content, and am not impressed. They do surface research, and likewise this makes them Liberal biased.
Trump is a flip-flopper. He's been dishonest about everything. The choice between him & Clinton is no choice at all.
http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/201...s-a-middle

yangusbeef

Helsworth Wrote:
Trump is a flip-flopper. He's been dishonest about everything. The choice between him & Clinton is no choice at all.
http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/201...s-a-middle


What about, "I try to pay as little {taxes} as possible, but what I do pay is none of your business." do you not understand and is dishonest?


Helsworth Wrote:
Trump is a flip-flopper. He's been dishonest about everything. The choice between him & Clinton is no choice at all.
http://www.crainsnewyork.com/article/201...s-a-middle


As for his flip flopping, that does not concern me. His espoused "fundamental principles" have not changed, and that is fine enough for me. Everything else, as he has said, is on the fence. In that sense, he is rather like a classical conservative.

Nietzsche

Speaking of fiascos:

yangusbeef

Nietzsche Wrote:
Speaking of fiascos:


The Scotland election was rigged. Most wanted to separate from EU, but as with most 'democracies' those votes weren't counted, and even changed.

Nietzsche

Oh sorry I had not heard that before, but now that you're saying it, it all makes sense.

Fundamental principles are not Trump's game. Neither in practice or theory.

Minimum Wage

Mr Trump told NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday that while he wishes to do away with the federal minimum wage, employers should pay workers more on a state-by-state basis.

“I have seen what's going on. And I don't know how people make it on $7.25 (£5) an hour,” he said.

“Now, with that being said, I would like to see an increase of some magnitude. But I'd rather leave it to the states. Let the states decide.”

However, during a November Fox Business debate, the presumptive Republican nominee felt differently about how much US workers earned, making it clear that he did not sympathise with workers who are fighting for a $15 (£10.42) minimum wage.

“I can’t be [sympathetic] … and the reason I can’t be is because we are a country that is being beaten on every front,” he said. “Taxes too high, wages too high, we’re not going to be able to compete against the world. … I would not raise the minimum.”

Taxing the wealthy

In the same Meet the Press appearance, Mr Trump went against a major core policy that has been a fixture of conservative politics for decades, and said he would likely increase taxes on the wealthiest Americans.

“The thing I’m going to do is make sure the middle-class get good tax breaks, because they have been absolutely shunned,” he said. “For the wealthy, I think frankly it’s going to go up - and you know what, I think it should go up.”

In a tax plan released by the Trump campaign last year, all Americans would receive tax breaks, but the wealthiest would still benefit significantly.

In an analysis by the Tax Policy Centre, the top one per cent of earners would receive a tax cut of more than $275,000 (17.5 per cent after-tax income). Individuals in the top 0.1 per cent of earners would receive a cut of at least $1.3m (19 per cent of after-tax income).

Middle-income households would receive a cut of about $2,700 (five per cent of after-tax income) in the plan. The lowest-income households, however, would not benefit quite as much from Mr Trump’s proposed tax plan as those with the highest incomes, with a cut of about $128 (one percent of after-tax income).

Campaign finance

Mr Trump has touted his $10bn worth in his campaign, highlighting the point that by self-funding he cannot be bought out by lobbyists.

“By self-funding my campaign,” he wrote in a September post on Facebook. “I am not controlled by my donors, special interests or lobbyists. I am only working for the people of the US!”

But in a 4 May interview, he told the Wall Street Journal he was reversing that position as well.

“I’ll be putting up money, but won’t be completely self-funding, as I did during the primaries,” he said.

Abortion

Mr Trump’s position on abortion came under scrutiny in March when he told MSNBC’s Chris Matthews that he supported a ban on the procedure, and women who undergo it should face punishment.

If abortion is banned in the US, “you’ll go back to a position like they had where people will perhaps go to illegal places. But you have to ban it,” Mr Trump said, adding, “There has to be some form of punishment.”

He quickly walked back the comments - which the Clinton campaign called “horrific and telling” - in a statement released by the campaign.

“This issue is unclear and should be put back into the states for determination. Like Ronald Reagan, I am pro-life with exceptions, which I have outlined numerous times,” he said.

But Mr Trump had been previously supportive of women’s right to choose.

In 1999, he told the Associated Press: “I believe it is a personal decision that should be left to the women and their doctors.”

And in his 2000 book, The America We Deserve, he wrote, “I support a woman’s right to choose, but I am uncomfortable with the procedures.”

Health Care

Mr Trump is opposed to a single-payer healthcare system and believes the industry should remain privatised.

“[Single payer] works in Canada. It works incredibly well in Scotland. It could have worked in a different age,” he said in the first GOP debate last year. “What I'd like to see is a private system without the artificial lines around every state.”

However, he said the opposite in a 1999 interview with CNN’s Larry King.

“If you can’t take care of your sick in the country, forget it, it’s all over. ... I believe in universal healthcare,” he said.

He expanded on the idea in his 2000 book.

Immigration

The most prominent facet of Mr Trump’s campaign has been his stance on immigration. He announced his candidacy in June 2015 by referring to Mexicans as “criminals” and “rapists,” and promised he would build a massive wall on the US’ southern border.

But when it comes to skilled immigrant labour, Mr Trump does not give quite as clear cut an idea of his position. According to the Washington Post, Mr Trump switched his stance on H-1B visas, which the US grants to skilled foreign workers at the request of business firms who need their expertise.

During a CNBC debate in October, Mr Trump said he supported skilled foreign workers, and that they should stay in the country.

“We’re losing some of the most talented people,” he said. “They go to Harvard. They go to Yale. They go to Princeton. They come from another country, and they’re immediately sent out. I am all in favour of keeping these talented people here so they can go to work in Silicon Valley.”

Following the debate, his campaign released a statement with a contrary position on the visa program.

“The H-1B program is neither high-skilled nor immigration: these are temporary foreign workers, imported from abroad, for the explicit purpose of substituting for American workers at lower pay,” Mr Trump said in the statement.

“I will end forever the use of the H-1B as a cheap labour program, and institute an absolute requirement to hire American workers first for every visa and immigration program. No exceptions.”

Looser Wording on the Temporary Muslim Ban

On Dec. 7, Trump called for "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what is going on.”

Over the proceeding five months, he talked about the "Muslim ban" extensively during campaign stops and hinted at various possible exceptions, including U.S. citizens who are Muslim, his wealthy Muslim friends from overseas and foreign leaders.

Trump told Fox News in May that the "temporary ban ... hasn't been called for yet. Nobody's done it. This is just a suggestion until we find out what's going on."

Guns

Trump was endorsed by the National Rifle Association and has repeatedly said he would not attempt to tinker with the Second Amendment, which gives citizens the right to bear arms, saying that Hillary Clinton "wants to abolish it."

"We're going to preserve it. We're going to cherish it. We're going to take care of it," Trump said during a speech to a NRA convention in May.

In spite of that, he has also repeatedly suggested that there should be some reforms, including an effort to stop people on the terror watch list from being able to get guns.

"If somebody is on a watch list and an enemy of state and we know it's an enemy of state, I would keep them away, absolutely," the presumptive Republican nominee said during an interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos in November.

He went back on that later in a GOP primary debate hosted by Fox News, when Trump responded "no" to the question of whether there are "any circumstances that you think we should be limiting gun sales of any kind in America."

Now, in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting and the endorsement he received from the NRA, he says he wants to meet with the gun-rights group to discuss potential ways to prevent people on terror watch lists from buying guns.

Accepting Syrian Refugees, or Not

In early September, Trump said that he would support asylum for refugees from Syria, given the circumstances in the country.

"I hate the concept of it, but on a humanitarian basis, you have to," Trump said during an interview on "The O'Reilly Factor" Sept. 8.

"But you know, it's living in hell in Syria. There's no question about it. They're living in hell, and something has to be done."

About three weeks later, during an event in Keene, New Hampshire, Trump reversed course and his language reflected it.

"I'm putting the people on notice that are coming here from Syria as part of this mass migration, that if I win, if I win, they're going back," he said.

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/...20831.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/history-d...d=39063811

And about Trump's tweet. Scotland had a referendum & they voted not to separate from the UK, precisely because they wanted to stay in the EU. Now that the UK is out, Scotland might have a different sort of referendum soon. I don't expect Trump to understand the history between England & Scotland.

Nietzsche

Helsworth Wrote:
And about Trump's tweet. Scotland had a referendum & they voted not to separate from the UK, precisely because they wanted to stay in the EU. Now that the UK is out, Scotland might have a different sort of referendum soon. I don't expect Trump to understand the history between England & Scotland.


I don't expect the guy to know anything about Europe, which is why I am so arrogant and don't care for his domestic agenda -- the best domestic agenda the US can pick is not making Trump President.

Of course, Clinton might not be the greatest answer as well. But that has been decided before and can't be changed now.

We're seeing Unions, countries and allies shifting away from one another right now, and we're seeing similar developments between groups within countries. It simply appears to be the time.
What I can not and will not accept is a shift in responsibility carefully crafted by the right winged populists: Those who speak against them are, in their opinion, responsible for the need and rise of (right winged) radicals because they've been called stupid and have been ignored.
That's a twisted logic. Very base feeling have been rising in a lot of people over the financial crisis, austerity, refugee crisis and the terrorist threat. These feelings are natural and the people are not to blame for being afraid. Politics has to find an answer to their fears, however, and I find it obscene to blame those who speak againt right winged populists for them -- we should continue blaming those who willingly filled that gap opened by the fears of the people, utilizing them for their campaigns and offering things that look like answers but are not answers at all, but emotionally loaded reactionary statements, roughly proclaiming free markets and authoriatarian civil societies; in short right winged populists.

The Trumps, Wilders, Le Pens, Farages and Gaulands are not misunderstood, they have not been treated wrongly. They have been opposed for not properly addressing fears, but for further nourishing them for their own benefits and agenda. And they shall be continued to be opposed.

Mussolini first tried laissez-faire policies to tackle the depression. When it didn't work, he turned to basic deficit spending. People who argue against deficit spending say that the war brought countries who tried it out of the depression. The gits are so foolish that they don't realize that the war was just a motive for deficit spending - the operational thing which put income in the hands of people & created output was Government spending. Fiscal and monetary operations have no ideology.
Laissez-faire nationalists will be the first to support collectivization, but only for 'foreigners'. They will only support broad collectivization if the country is at war with others. I consider myself a pessimist, a federalist, and a cosmopolitan. Ironically, nationalism is the natural response to imperialism/colonialism. And who knows better about colonialism than actual colonialist powers? Hehe

yangusbeef

Helsworth Wrote:
Fundamental principles are not Trump's game. Neither in practice or theory.

Minimum Wage

Mr Trump told NBC’s Meet the Press on Sunday that while he wishes to do away with the federal minimum wage, employers should pay workers more on a state-by-state basis.

“I have seen what's going on. And I don't know how people make it on $7.25 (£5) an hour,” he said.

“Now, with that being said, I would like to see an increase of some magnitude. But I'd rather leave it to the states. Let the states decide.”

However, during a November Fox Business debate, the presumptive Republican nominee felt differently about how much US workers earned, making it clear that he did not sympathise with workers who are fighting for a $15 (£10.42) minimum wage.

“I can’t be [sympathetic] … and the reason I can’t be is because we are a country that is being beaten on every front,” he said. “Taxes too high, wages too high, we’re not going to be able to compete against the world. … I would not raise the minimum.”

Taxing the wealthy

In the same Meet the Press appearance, Mr Trump went against a major core policy that has been a fixture of conservative politics for decades, and said he would likely increase taxes on the wealthiest Americans.

“The thing I’m going to do is make sure the middle-class get good tax breaks, because they have been absolutely shunned,” he said. “For the wealthy, I think frankly it’s going to go up - and you know what, I think it should go up.”

In a tax plan released by the Trump campaign last year, all Americans would receive tax breaks, but the wealthiest would still benefit significantly.

In an analysis by the Tax Policy Centre, the top one per cent of earners would receive a tax cut of more than $275,000 (17.5 per cent after-tax income). Individuals in the top 0.1 per cent of earners would receive a cut of at least $1.3m (19 per cent of after-tax income).

Middle-income households would receive a cut of about $2,700 (five per cent of after-tax income) in the plan. The lowest-income households, however, would not benefit quite as much from Mr Trump’s proposed tax plan as those with the highest incomes, with a cut of about $128 (one percent of after-tax income).

Campaign finance

Mr Trump has touted his $10bn worth in his campaign, highlighting the point that by self-funding he cannot be bought out by lobbyists.

“By self-funding my campaign,” he wrote in a September post on Facebook. “I am not controlled by my donors, special interests or lobbyists. I am only working for the people of the US!”

But in a 4 May interview, he told the Wall Street Journal he was reversing that position as well.

“I’ll be putting up money, but won’t be completely self-funding, as I did during the primaries,” he said.

Abortion

Mr Trump’s position on abortion came under scrutiny in March when he told MSNBC’s Chris Matthews that he supported a ban on the procedure, and women who undergo it should face punishment.

If abortion is banned in the US, “you’ll go back to a position like they had where people will perhaps go to illegal places. But you have to ban it,” Mr Trump said, adding, “There has to be some form of punishment.”

He quickly walked back the comments - which the Clinton campaign called “horrific and telling” - in a statement released by the campaign.

“This issue is unclear and should be put back into the states for determination. Like Ronald Reagan, I am pro-life with exceptions, which I have outlined numerous times,” he said.

But Mr Trump had been previously supportive of women’s right to choose.

In 1999, he told the Associated Press: “I believe it is a personal decision that should be left to the women and their doctors.”

And in his 2000 book, The America We Deserve, he wrote, “I support a woman’s right to choose, but I am uncomfortable with the procedures.”

Health Care

Mr Trump is opposed to a single-payer healthcare system and believes the industry should remain privatised.

“[Single payer] works in Canada. It works incredibly well in Scotland. It could have worked in a different age,” he said in the first GOP debate last year. “What I'd like to see is a private system without the artificial lines around every state.”

However, he said the opposite in a 1999 interview with CNN’s Larry King.

“If you can’t take care of your sick in the country, forget it, it’s all over. ... I believe in universal healthcare,” he said.

He expanded on the idea in his 2000 book.

Immigration

The most prominent facet of Mr Trump’s campaign has been his stance on immigration. He announced his candidacy in June 2015 by referring to Mexicans as “criminals” and “rapists,” and promised he would build a massive wall on the US’ southern border.

But when it comes to skilled immigrant labour, Mr Trump does not give quite as clear cut an idea of his position. According to the Washington Post, Mr Trump switched his stance on H-1B visas, which the US grants to skilled foreign workers at the request of business firms who need their expertise.

During a CNBC debate in October, Mr Trump said he supported skilled foreign workers, and that they should stay in the country.

“We’re losing some of the most talented people,” he said. “They go to Harvard. They go to Yale. They go to Princeton. They come from another country, and they’re immediately sent out. I am all in favour of keeping these talented people here so they can go to work in Silicon Valley.”

Following the debate, his campaign released a statement with a contrary position on the visa program.

“The H-1B program is neither high-skilled nor immigration: these are temporary foreign workers, imported from abroad, for the explicit purpose of substituting for American workers at lower pay,” Mr Trump said in the statement.

“I will end forever the use of the H-1B as a cheap labour program, and institute an absolute requirement to hire American workers first for every visa and immigration program. No exceptions.”

Looser Wording on the Temporary Muslim Ban

On Dec. 7, Trump called for "a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what is going on.”

Over the proceeding five months, he talked about the "Muslim ban" extensively during campaign stops and hinted at various possible exceptions, including U.S. citizens who are Muslim, his wealthy Muslim friends from overseas and foreign leaders.

Trump told Fox News in May that the "temporary ban ... hasn't been called for yet. Nobody's done it. This is just a suggestion until we find out what's going on."

Guns

Trump was endorsed by the National Rifle Association and has repeatedly said he would not attempt to tinker with the Second Amendment, which gives citizens the right to bear arms, saying that Hillary Clinton "wants to abolish it."

"We're going to preserve it. We're going to cherish it. We're going to take care of it," Trump said during a speech to a NRA convention in May.

In spite of that, he has also repeatedly suggested that there should be some reforms, including an effort to stop people on the terror watch list from being able to get guns.

"If somebody is on a watch list and an enemy of state and we know it's an enemy of state, I would keep them away, absolutely," the presumptive Republican nominee said during an interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos in November.

He went back on that later in a GOP primary debate hosted by Fox News, when Trump responded "no" to the question of whether there are "any circumstances that you think we should be limiting gun sales of any kind in America."

Now, in the wake of the Orlando nightclub shooting and the endorsement he received from the NRA, he says he wants to meet with the gun-rights group to discuss potential ways to prevent people on terror watch lists from buying guns.

Accepting Syrian Refugees, or Not

In early September, Trump said that he would support asylum for refugees from Syria, given the circumstances in the country.

"I hate the concept of it, but on a humanitarian basis, you have to," Trump said during an interview on "The O'Reilly Factor" Sept. 8.

"But you know, it's living in hell in Syria. There's no question about it. They're living in hell, and something has to be done."

About three weeks later, during an event in Keene, New Hampshire, Trump reversed course and his language reflected it.

"I'm putting the people on notice that are coming here from Syria as part of this mass migration, that if I win, if I win, they're going back," he said.

Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/...20831.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/history-d...d=39063811

And about Trump's tweet. Scotland had a referendum & they voted not to separate from the UK, precisely because they wanted to stay in the EU. Now that the UK is out, Scotland might have a different sort of referendum soon. I don't expect Trump to understand the history between England & Scotland.


Mostly lies and 'taken out of context('love' the one word 'quotes'), but I've come to expect that from Liberals.

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